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When to have bunion surgery?

Bunions, also known as hallux valgus, can present several symptoms that significantly affect the patient’s quality of life. These include pain and deformity in the big toe, and are often related to other problems such as claw toes, hammer toes and metatarsalgia, which refers to pain in the front part of the foot.

Hallux valgus, juanete en el pie sobre fondo blanco - blog

The decision to operate on bunions, scientifically known as hallux valgus, should be based on a detailed evaluation of symptoms, deformity and the impact of the deformity on the patient’s life. At Clínica San Roman, we recommend considering surgery in the following cases:

  1. Persistent and severe pain: When bunions cause considerable pain that is not relieved by non-surgical methods. Pain that interferes with daily activities, such as walking or performing tasks that require prolonged standing, may warrant surgery.
  2. Significant deformity: Surgery may be necessary if the bunion deformity is severe and causes problems in other toes, such as claw or hammer toes, or if it affects the overall alignment of the foot, leading to problems with posture or mobility.
  3. Limitation in mobility: When the bunion causes a significant restriction in the movement of the big toe, affecting the ability to walk or perform basic foot movements.
  4. Quality of life: The surgical decision is also based on how the bunion affects the patient’s quality of life. If a patient experiences chronic pain, difficulty with shodding or a decrease in daily activities, surgery may be a valid option.

At Clínica San Roman, each case is evaluated individually. Adetailed physical examination, imaging studies such as x-rays, biomechanical studies to assess the severity of the deformity, and the expectations and possible results of the intervention are clearly explained .

The decision of

When to have bunion surgery?

to proceed with surgery is always made in collaboration with the patient, considering both the medical aspects and the patient’s individual preferences and needs.

What happens if a bunion is not operated on?

Choosing not to have bunion surgery can have several consequences, especially if the bunion is painful, severe, affects other toes, or is affecting your quality of life. These are the main key points:

  1. Progression of the deformity: Bunions may worsen over time. If left untreated, the deformity may increase, which could lead to increased pain and difficulty walking. The bunion can cause the big toe to move further toward the other toes, exacerbating the condition and potentially causing problems in the other toes, such as claw toes or hammer toes.
  2. Ongoing pain and discomfort: The bunion may continue to cause pain, swelling and discomfort, especially when wearing shoes. This discomfort can limit footwear options and affect the ability to perform daily activities.
  3. Complications: If left untreated, bunions can lead to additional complications such as bursitis (painful inflammation of the bunion), and metatarsalgia (pain in the sole of the foot near the toes).
  4. Structural and mobility problems: The deformity may result in permanent changes in the structure of the foot. This can affect gait and posture, with possible repercussions in other parts of the body such as the knees and back at the lumbar level.

At Clinica San Roman, with over 40 years of experience in minimally invasive foot surgery, we prioritize a thorough evaluation of your symptoms and their impact on your daily life before considering surgery. However, when these conservative measures are not sufficient and your quality of life is compromised, surgery becomes an effective alternative to restore foot function and relieve pain.

Is it advisable to have bunion surgery?

The decision to have bunion surgery should be carefully evaluated, considering both the patient’s symptoms and the degree of deformity and its impact on the quality of life. When to have bunion surgery? is important. Here are the main considerations:

  1. Severity and symptoms: Surgery is usually recommended when bunions cause pain, limited mobility of the big toe, or severe foot alignment problems that do not improve with conservative treatments.
  2. Type of surgery: Advances in percutaneous surgical techniques have allowed for less invasive, safe, effective procedures with shorter recovery times.
  3. Results and recovery: Overall at Clinica San Roman, our patients experience an elimination of pain and an improvement in foot function post-surgery. However, full recovery may take several weeks to months.
  4. Risks and considerations: Like any surgical procedure, it carries certain risks, including infection, healing problems and the possibility of persistent pain or deformity. However, these risks are significantly minimized with percutaneous foot surgery, especially when performed by surgeons specialized in this technique, resulting in a higher success rate. It is crucial to discuss the decision to have surgery with a specialist who can consider all these factors in relation to the patient’s overall health and expectations..

In conclusion,
When to have bunion surgery?
Bunion surgery is recommended when conservative treatments have failed to relieve pain or correct the deformity that significantly affects the patient’s daily life.

An individualized evaluation with an orthopedic or podiatric specialist is crucial to make the best decision. For a detailed consultation, you may consider speaking with Dr. San Roman, who has extensive experience in the management and surgical treatment of this condition.

When to have bunion surgery?

The decision to have surgery for bunions, also known as hallux valgus, is generally considered when non-surgical interventions fail to relieve symptoms and the patient’s quality of life is significantly affected. Here are some commonly accepted criteria to consider bunion surgery, according to the best medical practices and recommendations of recognized health institutions:


  1. Persistent pain:
    Surgery may be recommended when the bunion causes ongoing pain that is not relieved by shoe changes, use of insoles, pain medications or other conservative therapies.

  2. Significant deformity:
    If the bunion is causing a pronounced deformity of the foot, altering the alignment of the big toe and affecting the functionality of the foot, surgery may be considered.

  3. Limitation in daily activities:
    When the bunion significantly interferes with daily activities, such as walking, exercising or even wearing shoes, it may be time to consider surgery.

  4. Failure of non-surgical treatments:
    If conservative methods have been applied adequately and for a sufficient period without obtaining improvement, surgery could be the next option.

  5. Progression of the deformity:
    In cases where the deformity is seen to continue to worsen despite conservative treatment, surgery may help prevent future complications.

The final decision to have bunion surgery should be made after a detailed consultation with an orthopedic or podiatric specialist, who will evaluate the severity of the deformity, the symptoms, the impact on the patient’s quality of life and other relevant health factors.

Hallux valgus en pies femeninos
When to have bunion surgery? A common question from users

At Clinica San Roman, we understand that effectively treating bunions involves more than just removing the visible bony protrusion. The deformity known as hallux valgus is due to the deviation of the first metatarsal and may require an osteotomy to address it correctly.

This surgical procedure involves making precise cuts in the first phalanx and, when necessary, in the metatarsal using minimally invasive or percutaneous surgical techniques to properly align the foot and remove the bony protrusion.
Contact us at Clínica San Roman to explore the best solution to your bunionette problem, where our personalized approach and our experience in advanced techniques guarantee effective and satisfactory results for our patients. We hope this article will answer the question of

When to have bunion surgery?

Thank you for visiting the frequently asked questions section where we answer the following questions
When to have bunion surgery?
of the San Roman Clinic. Our bunion surgery using minimally invasive or percutaneous techniques allows for a quick and comfortable recovery, without the need for hospitalization. This type of procedure, which does not require immobilization and causes minimal discomfort, significantly improves the quality of life of our patients, allowing them to resume their daily activities much sooner.

Bunion surgery is one of the most common procedures to treat foot problems and is performed as an outpatient procedure. This means that patients can return home the same day of surgery. Generally, recovery time after bunion surgery ranges from four to six weeks.

For more information about our techniques and services, please do not hesitate to contact us. We are here to help you take every step with comfort and confidence.

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When to have bunion surgery?
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